Articles

  • “Anatomy of a Farce,” WWHA Journal, vol. IV, no. 2, October 2011 (Buck).  Updates analysis of a media farce last summer caused by a historian giving contradictory versions of his theory  about a Butch Cassidy imposter to two different reporters, resulting in two stories, one saying the imposter was the outlaw and the other saying the imposter was not.
  • Atahualpa’s Ransom & Other Treasure Fables,” Peruvian Times, 26 August 2011 (Buck).  A brief history of the dreamers and schemers, the adventurers and swindlers, who have pursued Atahualpa’s lost ransom, the Jesuit gold trove at Sacambaya, and other legendary Andean treasures.  Yes, there is a Cassidy link, however tenuous.
  • Anatomy of a Farce,” True West, Forum, 23 August 2011 (Buck).  Analyzes media fiasco caused by a historian telling one reporter he had discovered new evidence showing that William T. Phillips was Butch Cassidy and a second reporter that he had determined Phillips was not Cassidy after all.
  • Needles and Cats: The Hunt for Butch and Sundance,” True West, November-December 2008 (Buck & Meadows). Looking for a needle in a haystack and a black cat in a dark cellar on a moonless night: 25 years trawling archives and listening to old-timer tales.
  • Butch and Sundance: Still Dead?” (PDF), NOLA Quarterly, April-June 2006, vol. XXX, no. 2 (Buck & Meadows). A revised version of a talk delivered at the WOLA Shootout in Santa Fe, New Mexico, 18 July 2005, and at the Tercer simposio sobre bandoleros norteamericanos en la Patagonia in Buenos Aires, Argentina, 23 November 2005. Surveyed more than sixty reports of the deaths of Butch and/or Sundance on three continents from the 1890s through the 1970s.
  • Butch Cassidy y Sundance Kid en Bolivia” (PDF) Anuario de Estudios Bolivianos, Archivísticos y Bibliográficos (Archivo y Biblioteca Nacionales de Bolivia, Sucre, Bolivia), no. 10, 2004 (Meadows & Buck). Versión refundida y notada de “Los últimos días de Butch Cassidy y el Sundance Kid” (1998).
  • Bandoleros Legendarios en Atacama,” Eco Pampino, no. 11, Abril 2003 (Buck & Meadows). Se trata de las visitas de Butch y Sundance al campamento minero Punta de Rieles, un villorrio cerca de Chuquicamata en el norte de Chile.
  • “Death in the Andes: Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid,” An Insider’s Guide to Bolivia, ed. Peter McFarren (Quipus Cultural Foundation, La Paz, Bolivia, 2003) (Meadows & Buck). Revised version of “The Last Days of Butch & Sundance,” Wild West, February 1997.
  • “‘Who are those guys?‘” True West, November/December 2002 (Buck & Meadows). Provides answers to common questions about Butch, Sundance, and Etta Place.
  • Back at the Ranch” (PDF), True West, November/December 2002 (Marcelo Gavirati). Author of Buscados en la Patagonia, Gavirati gives a succinct history of the Wild Bunch trio’s several years ranching in Patagonia.
  • The Last Ride” (PDF), True West, November/December 2002 (Meadows & Buck). Describes Butch and Sundance’s last holdup and their getaway route. Provides an inventory of what they had in their possession at the end of the trail.
  • High Doom in the Andes” (PDF), True West, November/December 2002 (Meadows, Buck, and Bob Boze Bell). Describes the San Vicente shootout and its aftermath.
  • Bogus Butches,” True West, November/December 2002 (Buck & Meadows). Discusses photos of the bandits, genuine and phony.
  • The Hole-in-the-Wall Nickelodeon” (PDF), True West, November/December 2002 (Buck & Meadows). Describes various movies that have featured Butch, Sundance, and/or Etta Place.  A list to which we can add Blackthorn (2011), a resurrectionist Western featuring a homesick, worse-for-wear Butch (Sam Shephard) in 1920s Bolivia with mob of miners and a rummy, morose ex-Pinkerton (Stephen Rea) on his trail.
  • “Butch & Sundance,” The English Westerners’ Tally Sheet, Summer 2002, vol. 48, no. 3 (Meadows & Buck). Summarizes Butch and Sundance’s history and describes how the myths about them have evolved.
  • Cloud Over Cassidy Letters” (PDF), Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal, vol. XI, no. 1, Spring 2002 (Buck). Discusses the possibility that Utah forger and murderer Mark Hofmann faked two letters and a note previously attributed to Butch Cassidy. Reprinted, without footnotes, in Pen and Quill, vol. XXXV, no. 5, September-October 2002.
  • “Wild Bunch Dream Girl: Memories Are Made of This,” True West, May-June 2002 (Buck & Meadows). Tells the story of Sundance’s chum, Ethel Place, with a focus on the myths and folklore.
  • “The History Channel vs. History,” Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal, vol. X, no. 1, Spring 2001 (Buck & Meadows). Reviews the History Channel’s “History vs. Hollywood” documentary about the film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and compares the handwriting in letters known to have been written by Butch Cassidy with that in a letter written by D.J. Myers, which was presented by the documentary as possible proof that Cassidy was alive after the shootout in San Vicente, Bolivia.
  • Mining Tupiza’s Marvels (PDF) / De Minas y Maravillas en Tupiza / Tupiza: porte d’entrée sud de la Bolivie,” Américas, January/February 2001 (Buck). Relates the history of Tupiza, Bolivia, headquarters of the Aramayo mining company, whose payroll Butch and Sundance robbed shortly before the shootout in which they perished. Relata la historia de Tupiza, Bolivia, el sitio de la oficina principal de la compañía minera Aramayo, cuya remesa robaron Butch y Sundance un poco antes de morir en un tiroteo.
  • That Bandit Girl” (PDF), Quarterly of the National Association for Outlaw and Lawman History, vol. XXIV, no. 4, October-December 2000 (Buck & Meadows). Discusses fanciful newspaper articles written about Etta Place in the early 1900s, articles that elevated her to an outlaw dominatrix: the “leader” of the Wild Bunch and “virtual ruler” of the Cholila Valley in Patagonia.
  • “Gunfighter Mythology: Butch & Sundance,” True West, August 2000 (Buck & Meadows). Describes various myths about what became of Butch and Sundance.
  • Sequels to a Patagonian Journal (PDF)/ Tras los pasos de Chatwin en Patagonia / Sur les Pas de Chatwin en Patagonie,”  Américas, March-April 2000 (Buck). Examines the attraction Patagonia had for British travel writer Bruce Chatwin, who visited Cholila in the 1970s and passed along folk tales about Butch and Sundance’s activities in South America. Describe la querencia para la Patagonia que tenía el autor Inglés Bruce Chatwin, quien escribió sobre Butch y Sundance en sudamérica.
  • “Witness to a Mystery,” Newsletter of the Outlaw Trail History Center, Fall 1999 (Buck & Meadows). Deconstructs a folk tale of Butch Cassidy’s return to Utah in the 1920s.
  • “Butch & Sundance Slept Here,” True West, September 1999 (Buck & Meadows). Describes several South American hotels frequented by Butch and Sundance and includes a copy of a November 1908 Bolivian newspaper article placing Butch in a Tupiza hotel just prior to the holdup he and Sundance committed shortly before dying in San Vicente.
  • Butch and Sundance Died in Bolivia,” APB Online, 11 January 1999 (Buck & Meadows). Provides a brief summary of the evidence that Butch and Sundance died in San Vicente on 6 November 1908.
  • “Los últimos días de Butch Cassidy y el Sundance Kid,” Bandoleros, salteadores y raterillos, por Antonio Paredes-Candia (Ediciones Isla: La Paz, 1998) (Meadows & Buck). Contiene un sumario de las experiencias que tuverion Butch y Sundance en sudamérica, con un foco en su último atraco y el tiroteo en Bolivia. (Spanish translation of “The Last Days of Butch & Sundance.”)
  • Did Butch Cassidy Return? His Family Can’t Decide” (PDF), Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal, vol. VI, no. 3, Spring 1998 (Buck & Meadows). Examines the many conflicting statements by Butch Cassidy’s relatives regarding his alleged return to North America after 1908.
  • “Saddle-up for the Southern Andes / Cabalgas en el sur de los Andes,” Américas, vol. 49, no. 6, November-December 1997 (Buck). Describes the trail Butch and Sundance reportedly used to take their cattle from Cholila across the Andes to market in Chile, and provides information about horseback excursions available today. Describe la ruta usada por Butch y Sundance entre su estancia en Cholila y el mercado en Chile, y da información sobre cabalgatas en el area.
  • “Footnotes: New Wild Bunch Documents Surface,” True West, August 1997 (Buck & Meadows). Describes documents recently found among land-office records for Argentina’s Chubut Territory. Includes a photo of the only known holographic signature of the Sundance Kid (alias H.A. Place) and establishes conclusively that the outlaws arrived in Cholila in 1901 and intended to settle there permanently.
  • Tap Duncan Wasn’t Killed: New Revelations About Harvey Logan Following the Parachute Robbery” (PDF), Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal, vol. V, no. 3, 1997 (Buck). Discusses the controversy over the identity of an outlaw who committed suicide after a botched train robbery near Parachute, Colorado, in 1904. Provides proof that Tap Duncan was alive long after the event and bolsters the case that Harvey “Kid Curry” Logan was the dead bandit.
  • “Outlaw Symposium in Argentina: Butch and Sundance Found Innocent of Holdup,” Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Newsletter, vol. VI, no. 2, Spring 1997 (Buck). Summarizes the highlights of an international symposium on North American bandits in Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia, organized by the Centro Nacional Patagónico and held in Esquel, Chubut, Argentina, in February 1997. Discusses the evidence that led the experts to conclude that Butch and Sundance could not have been the perpetrators of the February 1905 robbery of the Banco de Tarapacá y Argentino Limitado in Río Gallegos, Argentina, but that they had to flee Cholila after becoming suspected of the crime.
  • Wild Bunch in South America–Neighbors on the Hotseat: Revelations from Long-Lost Argentine Police File“(PDF), Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal, vol. V, no. 2, Spring-Summer 1996 (Buck & Meadows). Describes an investigation undertaken by judicial authorities into the Patagonian activities of several English-speaking bandits, including Butch Cassidy (alias James P. “Santiago” Ryan), the Sundance Kid (alias H.A. “Enrique” Place), Robert Evans, William Wilson, and Mansel Gibbon. Details the testimony of numerous witnesses, including friends, neighbors, and employees of the bandits as well as police officials. Discusses the imprisonment of Daniel Gibbon, a Welsh immigrant who was not only Butch and Sundance’s closest friend but also the father of Mansel Gibbon, a member of a gang that committed several crimes erroneously attributed to Butch and Sundance.
  • “Leaving Cholila,” True West, January 1996 (Buck & Meadows). Describes the bandits’ arrival in Chubut Territory in June 1901, their interactions with friends and neighbors, and their hasty departure in May 1905. Draws on material from Chubut police archives, including letters and other documents written or signed by Butch and Sundance.
  • “Cowboys Meet Gauchos: Wild-West Shows & Rodeos in Argentina in the Early 1900s,” South American Explorer, June 1993 (Buck). Describes several North American rodeo exhibitions to Buenos Aires between 1905 and the mid-1920s. Discusses Butch’s alleged attendance at a 1905 show, where he was said to have traded guns with one of the touring cowboys.
  • “�Murieron Butch Cassidy y Sundance Kid en Bolivia?” Opinión, Cochabamba, Bolivia, 10 March 1994 (Buck & Meadows). Explica la evidencia que sostiene el hipótesis que Butch y Sundance murieron en San Vicente, Potosí, Bolivia, y refuta la idea que ellos regresaron a los Estados Unidos después de 1908. Contiene citaciones a documentación archival y otras fuentes de información. (Spanish translation of “Did Butch and Sundance Die in Bolivia?”)
  • “Did Butch and Sundance Die in Bolivia?” Bolivian Studies, vol. IV, no. 1, 1993 (Buck & Meadows). Describes the evidence that Butch and Sundance died in San Vicente, Bolivia, and refutes the notion that they came back to the United States after 1908. Provides citations to archival material and other sources of information.
  • Surprising Development: The Sundance Kid’s Unusual–and Unknown–Life in Canada” (PDF), Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal, vol. III, no. 3, Winter 1993 (Buck). Fills in the blanks in a previously unknown (to U.S. researchers) chapter in Sundance’s life. Describes his employment breaking in horses for ranches and a railroad-construction company in Alberta; his stint as a saloon owner in Calgary; and his brush with the Canadian Mounties.
  • Skulduggery: Three Men and a Shovel” (PDF), True West, December 1993, and Bolivian Times, September 1993 (Buck & Meadows). Unravels a double hoax perpetrated by William F. Hutchens, a mischief-making engineer who invented the tale of an expedition (supposedly led by Bolivian president René Barrientos) that exhumed graves in San Vicente and failed to find Butch and Sundance’s bodies, and Kerry Ross Boren, an outlaw historian who confected documents to support the tale in an effort to prove that Butch and Sundance had not died in Bolivia.
  • “Travel Bolivia’s Outlaw Trail,” Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Newsletter, Fall 1993 (Buck & Meadows). Provides information about a new travel agency that takes tourists to several places that figured in the Bolivian chapter of the saga of Butch and Sundance.
  • Etta Place: A Most Wanted Woman” (PDF), Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal, vol. 3, no. 1, Spring-Summer 1993 (Buck & Meadows). Presents what little is known about the origins and fate of Sundance’s wife (common-law or otherwise); discusses several women (including Ann Bassett, Janet Magor, and Betty Weaver) erroneously identified as Etta Place; and describes the stories told about her in Patagonia.
  • Grave Doubts,” South American Explorer, June 1993 (Buck & Meadows). Reports the results of DNA testing of remains exhumed in San Vicente in 1991 by forensic anthropologist Clyde Snow, who concluded that the individual exhumed had had nothing to do with the 1908 shootout and was not Butch or Sundance.
  • “Etta Place: Wild Bunch Mystery Lady,” The English Westerners’ Society Tally Sheet, Spring 1993 (Buck & Meadows). (Republication of “Etta Place: A Most Wanted Woman.”)
  • “Showdown at San Vicente,” True West, February 1993 (Meadows & Buck). Drawing from the records of the Aramayo mining company (which lost an $80,000 payroll to two unidentified North American bandits in November 1908), the transcript of the judicial inquest into the deaths of the bandits during a shootout in San Vicente, and other contemporaneous sources, makes a strong–though circumstantial–case that the dead bandits were Butch and Sundance.
  • “The Wild Bunch in South America,” Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal, Part I (vol.1, no. 1, Spring-Summer 1991), Part II (vol.1, no. 2, Fall-Winter 1991), Part III (vol. 1, no. 3, Winter-Spring 1992), and Part IV (vol. 2, no. 2 Fall 1992) (Buck & Meadows). Recounts the December 1905 holdup of the Banco de la Nación in Villa Mercedes de San Luis, Argentina, by Butch, Sundance, Etta, and an unidentified companion; the tenacious pursuit of the bandits by several posses; the sardonic newspaper coverage of the crime and the pursuit; and the bandits’ escape across the border to Chile.
  • “Butch Cassidy en Bolivia: Su Vida y Su Muerte,” Opinión, Cochabamba, Bolivia, 6 February 1992 (Buck & Meadows). Hace un sumario de las actividades sudamericanas de Butch, Sundance, y Etta. Usando información de correspondencia diplomática iniciado por el vicecónsul americano Frank D. Aller en Antofagasta, Chile, presenta evidencia que un tiroteo ocurrió en San Vicente y que los bandoleros muertos fueron Butch y Sundance, según sus conocidos. (Spanish translation of “Running Down a Legend.”)
  • “Where Lies Butch Cassidy?” Old West, Fall 1991 (Buck & Meadows). Debunks the claims of William T. Phillips, a failed Spokane, Washington, businessman who pretended to be Butch Cassidy in the 1930s.
  • “Running Down a Legend / En Busca de una Leyenda,” Américas, vol. 42, no. 6, 1990-91 (Meadows & Buck). Provides an overview of the South American activities of Butch, Sundance, and Etta. Drawing from eighty-year-old diplomatic correspondence initiated by U.S. vice consul Frank D. Aller in Antofagasta, Chile, presents evidence that a shootout did occur in San Vicente and that the slain bandits were thought by acquaintances to have been Butch and Sundance. / Da un sumario de las actividades sudamericanas de Butch, Sundance, y Etta. Usando información de correspondencia diplomática iniciado por el vicecónsul americano Frank D. Aller en Antofagasta, Chile, presenta evidencia que un tiroteo ocurrió en San Vicente y que los bandoleros muertos fueron Butch y Sundance, según sus conocidos.
  • “Muchas Cuentas y Pocos Datos,” Feed Back, May 1988 (Buck & Meadows). Presenta unas versiones muy distinctas del asalto de el Banco de Tarapacá y Argentino Limitado en Río Gallegos, Argentina, en febrero 1905, un crimen atribuado a Butch y Sundance pero probablemente no cometido por ellos. (Spanish translation of “Wild Bunch Holdup in Argentina.”)
  • “The Aramayo Mule,” South American Explorer, February 1988 (Buck & Meadows). Describes explorer Hiram Bingham’s encounters with Scotsman James “Santiago” Hutcheon and other acquaintances of Butch and Sundance during a trip through southern Bolivia shortly after the shootout in San Vicente.
  • “Wild Bunch Holdup in Argentina,” National Association for Outlaw and Lawman History Quarterly, Winter 1987-88 (Buck & Meadows). Presents several wildly conflicting accounts of the February 1905 robbery of the Banco de Tarapacá y Argentino Limitado in Río Gallegos, Argentina, a crime attributed to Butch and Sundance but probably not committed by them.
  • “The Many Deaths of Butch Cassidy,” Pacific Northwest, July 1987 (Buck & Meadows). Compiles two dozen tales of Butch Cassidy’s demise, which allegedly occurred under various circumstances between 1898 and the 1950s in places ranging from the United States, Mexico, and France to several South American countries. Also analyzes the flaws in the argument that William T. Phillips was Butch Cassidy.
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